Boboli Gardens

The history of the Boboli Gardens goes back to 1549. It’s a remarkable example of landscape art of the Renaissance period. Visit of the Gardens begins with symmetric alleys which lead to oak trees and cypresses planted in a more chaotic manner. You can also see a few man-made lakes with sculptures in their centers. The whole territory of the Boboli Gardens is home to a collection of sculptures.

Florentine statue in the Boboli Gardens

Florentine statue in the Boboli Gardens

Another great advantage of the Gardens is breathtaking view both of the old city of Florence and Tuscany hills that surround Florence. There is also a small Porcelain Museum located on a small hill in the far end of the park just opposite Palazzo Pitti.

View of the old city of Florence

View of the old city of Florence

Another interesting attraction in the park is the Buontalenti grotto. A small grotto containing false stalactites was designed and created in 1592 by Bernardo Buontalenti, an Italian theatrical designer and artist. The grotto is a unique complex containing also the “Four Prisoners” of Michelangelo and the statue of Venus of Giambologna.

Despite the rain we were caught in right in the centre of the park we were more than impressed by the Boboli Gardens. We had visited a few European gardens before. But Palazzo Pitti, a good portion of Renaissance works of art, breathtaking views of Florence and beautiful pieces of art all over the park make the Boboli Gardens really special.